The Legacy of a Radical Black Newspaperman William Monroe Trotter rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages. By: Casey Cep

The Legacy of a Radical Black Newspaperman

The mustache had to go. A classic nineteenth-century handlebar, it was far too recognizable, so William Monroe Trotter shaved it off. In addition to the disguise, he arranged to take a cooking class in his boarding house, evincing a sudden interest that would have surprised his wife, mother, and two sisters.