Finding William Worthy in the Archives

The recent passing of African-American journalist and activist William Worthy brought renewed attention to an understudied figure in Black Press history.

Several years ago, William Worthy’s papers were acquired by the Special Collections and Archives at the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University.  They now reside less than a mile from the Archives of the Afro Newspaper, where Worthy was first employed as a journalist.  The Worthy Papers (circa 1940-2007) comprise 112 linear feet and include some amazing documents including letters, notes, and rare pamphlets.

Materials from Worthy’s first two decades in journalism include drafts and notes on his reporting for the Afro.  Potentially these materials allow scholars to understand what was edited, removed, or added during the process of creating a published newspaper article.  Most historians of 20th century African American history rely on the Black Press as a key source to establish how ideas were discussed and circulated within black communities.  More difficult for scholars has been the behind-the-scenes creation of the writings published in the Black Press. The Worthy Papers have the potential to reveal something of this process of creation.  

Did a committed leftist like Worthy face any pressure to tone down his writings or were they acceptable within the Afro’s editorial standards at the time?  Worthy’s notes and correspondence may answer this question and many others.

Worthy is certainly a person who deserves more scholarly attention.  As an activist and international figure, he was on the ground for so many important events in the second half of the 20th century despite the efforts of the US government to limit his travel. As a journalist, Worthy was also part of the first generation of black journalists who found work as journalists in white-owned media outlets.  Each of these periods of Worthy’s life is richly documented in his papers.  For scholars interested in these issues, a trip to Special Collection at Johns Hopkins is in order.

A finding aid for the William Worthy Papers can be found here.  Note: some parts of the collection may be closed for further processing, so call before you visit.